Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences.

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  • Author(s): Carlson RW;Carlson RW; Zaki J; Zaki J
  • Source:
    Psychological reports [Psychol Rep] 2022 Aug; Vol. 125 (4), pp. 2191-2212. Date of Electronic Publication: 2021 May 26.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal Article
  • Language:
    English
  • Additional Information
    • Source:
      Publisher: SAGE Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 0376475 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1558-691X (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 00332941 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Psychol Rep Subsets: MEDLINE
    • Publication Information:
      Publication: 2016- : Thousand Oaks, CA : SAGE
      Original Publication: Louisville, Ky. : Southern Universities Press,
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Are humans ever truly altruistic? Or are all actions, however noble, ultimately motivated by self-interest? Psychologists and philosophers have long grappled with this question, but few have considered laypeople's beliefs about the nature of prosocial motives. Here we examine these beliefs and their social correlates across two experiments (N = 445). We find that people tend to believe humans can be, and frequently are, altruistically motivated-echoing prior work. Moreover, people who more strongly believe in altruistic motives act more prosocially themselves-for instance, sacrificing greater amounts of money and time to help others-a relationship that holds even when controlling for trait empathy. People who believe in altruistic motives also judge other prosocial agents to be more genuinely kind, especially when agents' motives are ambiguous. Lastly, people independently show a self-serving bias-believing their own motives for prosociality are more often altruistic than others'. Overall, this work suggests that believing in altruistic motives predicts the extent to which people both see altruism and act prosocially, possibly reflecting the self-fulfilling nature of such lay theories.
    • Contributed Indexing:
      Keywords: Altruism; lay theories; prosocial behavior; self-interest; social cognition
    • Publication Date:
      Date Created: 20210526 Date Completed: 20220803 Latest Revision: 20220803
    • Publication Date:
      20220908
    • Accession Number:
      10.1177/00332941211013529
    • Accession Number:
      34034589
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CARLSON, R. W.; ZAKI, J. Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences. Psychological reports, [s. l.], v. 125, n. 4, p. 2191–2212, 2022. DOI 10.1177/00332941211013529. Disponível em: https://ezproxy.mscc.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cmedm&AN=34034589. Acesso em: 3 out. 2022.
    • AMA 11th Edition:
      Carlson RW, Zaki J. Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences. Psychological reports. 2022;125(4):2191-2212. doi:10.1177/00332941211013529
    • APA 7th Edition:
      Carlson, R. W., & Zaki, J. (2022). Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences. Psychological Reports, 125(4), 2191–2212. https://doi.org/10.1177/00332941211013529
    • Chicago 17th Edition:
      Carlson, Ryan W, and Jamil Zaki. 2022. “Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences.” Psychological Reports 125 (4): 2191–2212. doi:10.1177/00332941211013529.
    • Harvard:
      Carlson, R.W. and Zaki, J. (2022) ‘Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences’, Psychological reports, 125(4), pp. 2191–2212. doi:10.1177/00332941211013529.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Carlson, RW & Zaki, J 2022, ‘Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences’, Psychological reports, vol. 125, no. 4, pp. 2191–2212, viewed 3 October 2022, .
    • MLA 9th Edition:
      Carlson, Ryan W., and Jamil Zaki. “Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences.” Psychological Reports, vol. 125, no. 4, Aug. 2022, pp. 2191–212. EBSCOhost, https://doi.org/10.1177/00332941211013529.
    • Chicago 17th Edition:
      Carlson, Ryan W, and Jamil Zaki. “Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences.” Psychological Reports 125, no. 4 (August 2022): 2191–2212. doi:10.1177/00332941211013529.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Carlson RW, Zaki J. Belief in Altruistic Motives Predicts Prosocial Actions and Inferences. Psychological reports [Internet]. 2022 Aug [cited 2022 Oct 3];125(4):2191–212. Available from: https://ezproxy.mscc.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cmedm&AN=34034589